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Hyperscope: Did you really see what you saw?

19 Mar

Back in the 1980’s Terry Pope, then of the University of Reading, created the Hyperscope which increased the distance between the eyes thereby adjusted the perception of distance and measurement of objects.  Why? The Hyperscope was created to glean a better understanding of our vision system particularly so that when we see an object, we see a more three dimensional image.

 When we look at an object, each of our eyes delivers rapid images to our brain. Our brain intellectualizes what it knows about objects, quickly sorting the images and sends a message back of the three-dimensional object before us.  Thank you very much oh intelligent one! 

Without the help of our brain, we would probably never pour water in a glass because the glass would look obscured to us and it is likely that we would think that the glass could not possibly hold water.  Luckily, our brain jumps to the rescue and adjusts the object, telling our eyes that the object is really a three-dimensional object and can indeed hold water.  It is really a matter of survival. The brain patiently works with our eyes to make what we see make sense. Easy enough right?

Our visual system is a complex system of teamwork between the brain and our eyes.  Terry Pope created the Hyperscope to gain a clearer understanding of the perception of depth and hence an appreciation for our visual system.  The Hyperscope increased the distance between the eyes from approximately 65 millimeters to 415 millimeters and in doing so allowed the viewer to see objects in a more three dimensional format.   

The Hyperscope, then, is an interesting tool that aids our understanding of our visual system by allowing us to see images with a more three-dimensional distinction.  If you are so inclined, you could build a similar tool at home.  Now take a gander at checking out objects at varying distances while removing and replacing your cyborg spectacles.

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The Automatic Double Axis Tourbillon Watch

17 Mar

If you have been lucky enough to experience one of Thomas Prescher’s amazing pieces, his latest, the Automatic Double Axis Tourbillon Watch, will not disappoint you.  For those not acquainted with this incredible artisan’s work, a close look at this extraordinary watch will simply amaze you. 

The ingenuity of the watch is that it displays only the tourbillon while all else is cleverly hidden.  That is, it is impossible to tell how the watch adjusts the time and date because all mechanisms associated to the actual movement of the watch, except the tourbillon, is concealed within the casing. 

Mr. Prescher displays the hours on a left revolving cylinder and the minutes on a right revolving cylinder.  A silver ball sits between the two rotating cylinders, cleverly giving the watch a balancing appearance.  In keeping with the fine lines of symmetry and balance, two crowns lie on the right and left side of the watch– one for winding and one for setting the watch.

Located at the base and suspended between the two sides of the watch, is a bar that displays the month and the date.  The bar winds automatically and because it is weighted, one can always see the month and day—whether viewing the watch from either the back or the front.

The focal point of the watch, the double-axis tourbillon, is displayed in the center of the watch.  It is debatable whether a tourbillon adds precision to a watch; and for many, a tourbillon is a mere novelty!  Nevertheless, there is no question that the Prescher tourbillons display the artisan’s incredible talent. The tourbillon in the Automatic Double Axis Tourbillon Watch is suspended midway across the watch from the left side.  By placing the tourbillon in the center of the watch, Mr. Prescher focuses the viewer on the brilliance of his latest creation. 

The display shown here is merely a model and therefore has only mineral glasses.  The final watch is expected to be encased in antireflection sapphire casing, which means there will be no streaks from any viewing vantage point!

 

Visit Thomas Prescher’s official website here:  http://www.prescher.ch/

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An Artistic Fusion of Insect & Technology

13 Mar

In these interestingly unique creations, Mike Libby of Insect Lab fused technology and insects to create products that beat the wildest imaginations. Safe insects are imported from every corner of the globe—from Africa to Brazil to Texas and sometimes Mr. Libby’s back yard. The insects are dissected and parts from watches and electrical apparatuses such as typewriters and sewing machines are inserted into the dissected insect. Endangered insects are never used.

The beetle below is a Rhino beetle and is a Dynastidae. This piece is four and a quarter inches wide. It has brass gears and parts and a red LED. The Rhino beetle has a six-inch glass dome with a walnut base and retails at $1,425 .00.

The flower beetle below is a Rutelidae. It has steel, glass and brass gears and parts. It has a four-inch dome and walnut base and retails at $700.00. **At the time of this writing, this flower beetle has been sold.
The longhorn beetles below are of the Cerambycidae family. It has steel gears, parts and springs. The medium has a five-inch dome and walnut base and the big longhorn has a six-inch dome and walnut base. The medium longhorn beetle retails at $1,300.00 and the big longhorn beetle retails at $1,700.00.

Next up are members of the arachnidan family. The black scorpion below sports steel gears, springs and parts and is six inches long with a walnut base. It retails at $1,450.00. The tarantula has brass and steel gears, springs and parts and has a six-inch glass dome with a walnut base. The tarantula retails at $1,250.00

Why not head on over to Insect Lab, http://www.insectlabstudio.com, to view these and other insect and technology combinations? Consider this a dare!

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A Ring in Gear

13 Mar

Remember the days of your youth when you would play with those huge plastic gears for hours on end?  Sky was the limit to the number of combinations you were able to achieve with these gears!  No fibbing:  This writer happens to have a set of magnetic gears on the fridge.  That being said, you will forgive the excitement over the Gear Ring by Kinekt Designs. 

The Gear Ring is constructed of sturdy steel and has six small precision gears that turn in unison when the outer ring is turned.  Women, the current available sizes will probably only fit your thumb as ring sizes available are 9, 10, 11 and 12.  Kinekt Designs promises that sizes 5, 6, 7, 8 and 13 will be available soon

If you enjoy cool gadgets, you will like the Gear Ring.  Admit it, you tend to twist your rings as you wait for some event to start or finish.  Now you can be entertained with the Gear Ring while you wait.

Check out the YouTube video to see the ring in action!  Gear Ring on YouTube

Visit Kinekt Designs here:   http://www.kinektdesign.com/products.php

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The Quenttin, Exclusive Sophistication

11 Mar

At 56 x 47 millimeters, the Quenttin is slightly larger than the average man’s watch.  In its defense though, the watch has plenty to offer and ought to strut its stuff in a big way.  Classy women and sophisticated men alike can carry off this very exquisite watch that reminisces of a previous watch, the 1974 Swissonic by Jaz Derby. Still, one should not be side tracked by the comparison to the Swissonic, because there is nothing outdated about The Quenttin by Jacob & Co.  Furthermore,  only the Cabestan can compete with it.

Displayed through a sapphire crystal case are seven barrels.  These seven barrels roll vertically to give The Quenttin a 744-hour power reserve.  Awesome! A full month of power in reserve!  Mechanical movement in The Quenttin is regulated by a Swiss anchor mounted in a tourbillon case which does not use rollers and is vertically suspended.  The escapement is operated by an integrated key, an external hand key or motorized in the box.   This means that the tourbillon can be fine tuned manually or the on/off key can be used to set up the time.  The Quenttin is a 40-jeweled watch thus precision movement will be ongoing for an extraordinarily long time.  Typically, manual watches used 7 jewels and most Rolexes have only 25 jewels!

The day, hour and minutes are displayed behind the sapphire crystal display case and on vertically rotating wheels which are aligned on a coaxial.  The proud owner has a choice of either an 18 karat white gold, 18 karat rose gold, red magnesium, black magnesium or a platinum bezel.   All watches have a rubber band.  The Quenttin is water resistant to 30 meters (100 feet) and has a two-year warranty.  It should be noted that Jacob & Co.’s The Quenttin is limited and the company offers only 99 pieces in the white gold and 18 pieces in the black and the red magnesium.  The platinum is available only on request.

Certainly wearing The Quenttin will display one’s exclusive taste; but, one would have to come up with at least $ 300,000 to do so!

Visit all models of the Quenttin at Jacob & Co.’s official cite:  http://www.jacobandco.com/quenttin1.htm

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Fluid Zoho Artform No. 1 — Animatronics Sculpture of Many Movements

09 Mar

Meet, Zoho Artform No. 1.  Perish the thought; Zoho is of no relations to 3CPO.  Yes, the Star Wars audio-animatronics was superbly intelligent; but, Zoho Artform No. 1 makes no attempt to vocalize his intelligence.  Why bother talking when one has smooth lithe movements that are downright impressive?

Mark Ho congruently models human movement with his animatronics, Zoho Artform No. 1.  Perched on a magnetic base which can be activated or deactivated, and composed of bronze and stainless steel, Zoho has 920 hand-made parts.  Of the 920 parts, 101 parts are movable.  The ratio of moveable parts to actual number of parts seems about right—considering that it takes nine muscles and three hand nerves just to control the human thumb.   Zoho parallels human movement like no other animatronics and his 920 parts allow him to take on just about any human position. 

Because of his many moveable parts, Zoho is able to point his finger, bend his knees, arch his back and take on an incredible number of human stances.  In this stance of the back flip, Zoho seems caught in movement rather than placed in position.

 And in this seated position, Zoho arguably rivals Auguste Rodin’s The Thinker in capturing a human in deep thought. Zoho’s many moveable parts allow him to take on even the slightest human movements, making his poses seem more fluid and life-like.  Even though Zoho is composed of steel and bronze, one does not think robot when gazing at him but rather one thinks human in motion.  

You may want to hurry if you wish to obtain Zoho because the ownership club is quite exclusive.  Mark Ho has created only 25 Zoho Artform No. 1 sculptures.  Should you decide to join this exclusive ownership club, Zoho will cost you somewhere above $50, 000.  Think you can make Zoho do 50,000 different poses?  Get one and let us know!

 

Link to the Zoho Artforms official site:  http://www.zohoartforms.com

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The Cabestan Winch Tourbillon Vertical Watch

08 Mar

The Cabestan Winch Tourbillion Vertical WatchEven though it commands a cool $400K, the Cabestan Winch Tourbillon Vertical Watch may not be considered a novelty, but it is very much worth considering.  Stop laughing, we all can dream!  Besides, $400K will buy the top of the line version; there is a base version available for approximately $275K!

Okay fine, the lever to adjust the time does somewhat resemble the crank of a louver, but when DMC Group’s Jean-Francois Ruchonnet created this piece, it is clear he was aiming for agile synchronization coupled with an incomparably unique design.  And, he nailed it!  

 Cabestan - Horizontal Precision

The Cabestan Winch Tourbillon Vertical Watch has 1,352 parts that move in precise unison.  Remember the previously mentioned crank?  Well, the crank is actually a winch.  The winch turns a 450-link chain which is wrapped around nickel barrels that display the time.  There is an additional winch hidden in the buckle of the watch that sets the many parts in motion.   The watch uses a capstan to rotate the chain and hence adjust the time.  The vertical tourbillon, of course, ensures precision.

 Cabestan - 450-link chain and nickel drums

The Cabestan Winch Tourbillon Vertical Watch is made as watches were originally made—one at a time, by hand, under a microscope with great attention to detail.  Imagine 1,352 very small parts being connected by hand! It is no wonder that the company produces only four of these watches per month!

Just in case one might be having difficulties justifying a hefty $400K price tag, take note that the watch is available encased in platinum, yellow gold, rose gold or black titanium; and, the watch can also be adorned with diamonds. Now, if at this point you are still considering all the things you could buy with $400k, there is an excellent chance that you may want to do like the rest of us and order yours in your dreams.  Hmm, that black titanium looks incredible—minus the diamonds please.

Link to the Cabestan official website:  http://www.cabestan-watches.ch/

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Turn your body into a TOUCHSCREEN

04 Mar

Body Touchscreen

Called Skinput, the system is a marriage of two technologies: the ability to detect the ultralow-frequency sound produced by tapping the skin with a finger, and the microchip-sized “pico” projectors now found in some cellphones.

The system beams a keyboard or menu onto the user’s forearm and hand from a projector housed in an armband. An acoustic detector, also in the armband, then calculates which part of the display you want to activate.

Read More in NewScientist Article:

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn18591-body-acoustics-can-turn-your-arm-into-a-touchscreen.html

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Gadgets Mania!

03 Mar

Site will be ready soon, untill then follow us on twitter!

http://twitter.com/CoolGizmos

We will be presenting you intersting gadget and new technology news from allover the net for a while, before we will start with our own gadget reviews!

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